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Slaybrook Tunnel - Kent

The Slaybrook Tunnel was built to facilitate the passage of steam trains through a hillside for a matter of a couple of hundred yards. The line was built as an extension to an earlier line which is still in use and suffered the fate of many other branch lines all over the country. It was closed several years ago and the track ripped up.

The route can still be traced on a map and some of it is accessible although tricky going.

The crumbling, graffiti covered and litter strewn tunnel is hidden amidst fallen trees and is full of water making accessibility to the tunnel mouth exceptionally difficult and the tunnel itself is flooded over its entire length.

 

WARNING – DANGER OF INJURY AND HEALTH AND SAFETY RISKS IN THE TUNNEL

 

The Investigation
Aim:

To investigate reports of paranormal activity at the Slaybrook Tunnel.

Background:

Ghost Connections previous visit was of interest and prompted a return visit if only to find the elusive tunnel.

After posting our 'expedition' report from two weeks previously one of our founders, Dean, contacted us with better directions of how to find this tunnel and as he was one of the witnesses to previous events we decided we should return as soon as possible to at least locate the site and review its feasibility for a future investigation.

Apparatus:

Video camera-
Sony DCR-HC19 with night vision and Sony HVL- IRM IR light


Digital Camera-
Fuji Fine Pix S5500
Fuji Fine Pix S5500

Team:

Kim
Paddy
Dave


Method:

Using visual and scientific methods combined with spiritual information investigate the background to alleged paranormal phenomena at this venue.


Investigation:


Following an easy trek along a signed footpath we explored various deep cuttings on the sides of our route eventually realising we were walking along the track bed of the original railway.

Around us we could hear fireworks igniting in the evening air. None could be seen however and we pressed on in absolute darkness until reaching a point where we could make out brickwork below and to the side of us.

We re-traced our route and found that we were going to have to contend with marshy ground caused by an outflow of water from the tunnel and a mass of fallen and rotten trees across our path. Steep banks on either side made for firmer footing but their angle of incline made the walk hazardous when uncertain of what the ground on the level below us consisted of.

Paddy reached the tunnel mouth first and due to noises heard by the whole team we extinguished all lights. Remaining still we listened intently. There were sounds of water splashing as if someone were walking steadily towards us through the tunnel. The ground surface was totally obscured by water containing many obstacles. We waited as we listened in anticipation of another being appearing at our end as the sound got closer. There was no torch light to be seen in the tunnel.

After a while the noises ceased and we made our way to the entrance and stood there admiring the brickwork and bewildered at the amount of debris in an inaccessible tunnel, all of which was part submerged in the water for the whole length and width of the tunnel. The depth of the water was impossible to gauge without progressing into it and we were not equipped for safely attempting this.

There were numerous noises in the undergrowth nearby and we waited for an animal to emerge. It did not.

We saw flashes in the trees above us higher on the bank. There was no noise accompanying these.

We distinctly heard noises of movement within the tunnel both within the water and without.

   
   
    Results
    As this was a fleeting visit to recce the area and with another investigation site to get to we spent about an hour here. No audio was taken although video and still photographs were taken.

The fireworks were amplified by the tunnel and could clearly be heard naturally and also through the amplification. No illuminations could be seen when these occurred.

The lights seen in the trees were assumed to be either persons walking on the higher footpath or fireworks yet we discounted both due to other identified fireworks and also the fact that these were accompanied neither by persons appearing or sounds of fireworks. They currently remain unexplained.

The noises in the tunnel were considered to be fireworks yet were indentifiably within the tunnel itself and not outside. We cannot account for them. It is completely unsafe for any persons to enter the tunnel unaccompanied and without safety equipment and this option can be discounted. Noone appeared physically to us.

The noises in the undergrowth may well have been caused by animals.

Camcorder footage and still photographs a were later examined and nothing of note was found other than the sound described previously. Recordings of this may appear on our separate pages later.

 
 

Conclusion

The Slaybrook Tunnel did not yield many secrets during our short visit yet we were unable to explain some of what we saw and heard.

We did not hear the steam train as reported by Dean.

Another visit is definitely on the cards for 2008.

Addition
Further research after the event would highlight accounts of witnesses to sightings of a railworker with a lantern being seen on this stretch of deserted track. Was it this that we saw among the trees and heard walking through the tunnel.

This additional information combined with original sensations means this is definitely due a return trip in better conditions!

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27th October 2007

2004/2007 Ghost Connections UK